LRDG vs Panzer DAK – the Ultimate North African Bundle is Now Available

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

SHOP NOW

The legendary LRDG faced off against axis forces in North Africa throughout WWII, and now you can stage their epic raiding tactics with this limited run bundle from Brickmania.

This epic bundle includes the LRDG GMC 30 CWT Truck, the Panzer II DAK and the M1 Tactical Palm Tree.

The LRDG (Long Range Desert Group) was a group of British Commonwealth soldiers, created in the summer of 1940, during the war in North Africa. Its primary role was to provide long range surveillance of troop movements in Axis territory. Its secondary role was to make lightning strikes on targets deep behind enemy lines, causing a great deal of confusion, terror and panic in the rear areas. The LRDG was organized into a series of patrols comprised of  volunteers from New Zealand, England and Southern Rhodesia (a British colony, now called Zimbabwe).  They would often work in isolated patrol areas for weeks at a time. The LRDG was credited as being one of the most successful unconventional units of World War II and routinely cited for providing the best source of up to date intelligence on enemy troop movements.

The long distances of the patrols required special vehicles, for which civilian trucks were acquired and customized to the LRDG needs. Each patrol contained several heavily modified GMC 30 CWT (Imperial Hundredweight) trucks, each carried a three man crew and a variety of heavy weapons and supplies. Special equipment included sand channels attached to the side of each truck, which were used in the event the truck became stuck in deep sand. The trucks were also outfitted with extra large radiators connected by a hose to a specially designed condenser cannister. This allow the LRDG trucks to operate over long distances in the extremely hot desert environment.

The LRDG faced off against the DAK (Deutsches Afrikakorps), the German expeditionary force in Africa during the North African Campaign. First sent as a holding force to shore up the Italian defense of their African colonies, the formation fought on in Africa, under various appellations, from March 1941 until its surrender in May 1943. The term “Afrika Korps” is pseudo-German (so-called “cod-German”), deriving from an incomplete German title. The German term referred solely to the initial formation, the DAK, which formed part of the Axis command of the German and Italian forces in North Africa. The name stuck, with both news media and Allied soldiers, as the name for all subsequent German units in North Africa. The unit is known for having been commanded by Field Marshal Erwin Rommel.

The Brickmania Panzer II Ausf C was modeled after the tanks of the DAK, using the desert color scheme.  The Panzer II was German light tank of World War II. It was a stop-gap design, rushed into production just prior to the outbreak of fighting,  while the more advanced Panzer III and Panzer IVs were still under development. Armed with a 20mm cannon and MG34 machine gun, the Panzer proved to be a competent design and played a significant role early in the war. It participated in such as the campaigns in Poland, France, Soviet Union, and North Africa. While it was a successful design, the Panzer II’s light armor and weapons would be no match for heavier Allied equipment introduced later in the war. The Panzer II chassis was also used for several self-propelled guns, including the effective Mardar II tank destroyer and the Wespe 105mm howitzer.

We’ve also included the M1 Tactical Palm Tree mini kit, so that you can start building a LEGO oasis of your own.

This deal is so good it’s sure to fly off the shelves, so don’t delay and get yourself one of these bundles.  The Desert Raider Bundle is perfect for Easter gift-giving as each of the 3 kits come packaged separately and ship together.

SHOP NOW | STORE | EMAIL LIST

Advertisements
This entry was posted by Mariah Lamkin.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: